Republic, Lost

Republic, Lost

How Money Corrupts Congress--and A Plan to Stop It

Book - 2011
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Grand Central Pub
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In an era when special interests funnel huge amounts of money into our government-driven by shifts in campaign-finance rules and brought to new levels by the Supreme Court inCitizens United v. Federal Election Commission-trust in our government has reached an all-time low. More than ever before, Americans believe that money buys results in Congress, and that business interests wield control over our legislature.

With heartfelt urgency and a keen desire for righting wrongs, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig takes a clear-eyed look at how we arrived at this crisis: how fundamentally good people, with good intentions, have allowed our democracy to be co-opted by outside interests, and how this exploitation has become entrenched in the system. Rejecting simple labels and reductive logic-and instead using examples that resonate as powerfully on the Right as on the Left-Lessig seeks out the root causes of our situation. He plumbs the issues of campaign financing and corporate lobbying, revealing the human faces and follies that have allowed corruption to take such a foothold in our system. He puts the issues in terms that nonwonks can understand, using real-world analogies and real human stories. And ultimately he calls for widespread mobilization and a new Constitutional Convention, presenting achievable solutions for regaining control of our corrupted-but redeemable-representational system. In this way, Lessig plots a roadmap for returning our republic to its intended greatness.

While America may be divided, Lessig vividly champions the idea that we can succeed if we accept that corruption is our common enemy and that we must find a way to fight against it. In REPUBLIC, LOST, he not only makes this need palpable and clear-he gives us the practical and intellectual tools to do something about it.


Baker & Taylor
A Harvard Law professor explains how being influenced by money overshadows the will of the people in the political arena regardless of party lines and offers strategies to take back the democracy from those with moneyed or corporate interests. 35,000 first printing.

Hachette Book Group
@font-face { font-family: "Times"; }@font-face { font-family: "Geneva"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; color: black; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; } In an era when special interests funnel huge amounts of money into our government-driven by shifts in campaign-finance rules and brought to new levels by the Supreme Court in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission-trust in our government has reached an all-time low. More than ever before, Americans believe that money buys results in Congress, and that business interests wield control over our legislature.

With heartfelt urgency and a keen desire for righting wrongs, Harvard law professor Lawrence Lessig takes a clear-eyed look at how we arrived at this crisis: how fundamentally good people, with good intentions, have allowed our democracy to be co-opted by outside interests, and how this exploitation has become entrenched in the system. Rejecting simple labels and reductive logic-and instead using examples that resonate as powerfully on the Right as on the Left-Lessig seeks out the root causes of our situation. He plumbs the issues of campaign financing and corporate lobbying, revealing the human faces and follies that have allowed corruption to take such a foothold in our system. He puts the issues in terms that nonwonks can understand, using real-world analogies and real human stories. And ultimately he calls for widespread mobilization and a new Constitutional Convention, presenting achievable solutions for regaining control of our corrupted-but redeemable-representational system. In this way, Lessig plots a roadmap for returning our republic to its intended greatness.

While America may be divided, Lessig vividly champions the idea that we can succeed if we accept that corruption is our common enemy and that we must find a way to fight against it. In REPUBLIC, LOST, he not only makes this need palpable and clear-he gives us the practical and intellectual tools to do something about it.

Baker
& Taylor

A Harvard Law professor explains how being influenced by money overshadows the will of the people in the political arena regardless of party lines and offers strategies to take back the democracy from those with moneyed or corporate interests.

Publisher: New York : Twelve, 2011
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780446576437
0446576433
Branch Call Number: 328.73 Lessig 2011
Characteristics: xiii, 383 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm

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StarGladiator
Dec 30, 2013

[Anyone who believes Lessig is a real progressive also believes it is moral to take innocents, or protesters, out to sea off the coast of Chile and drop them from a helicopter into shark-infested waters.] This book is obfuscatory on many fronts, but most of all, because Lessig supports the status quo. The file on Lawrence Lessig: he clerked for Richard Posner and Antonin Scalia, and although not officially a member of the ultra-neocon Federalist Society, he has spent far too much time speaking at the organization and at their dinners. (When SCOTUS Justice Kagan was head of Harvard law school almost everyone of her appointments to the faculty belonged to the Federalist Society: the one exception being Lessig.) When Lessig was given the positive and uplifting information that the federal prosecutors of Aaron Swartz would withdraw their demand that he not ever be allowed to sign online to the Web/Internet, Lessig decided to wait a few days to pass on the information, which he couldn't do since a despondent Swartz had committed suicide by then, believing the worst was to come. Lessig, several months later, would be an invited guest to the yearly Bilderberger conference held that year in Switzerland, meeting with the likes of Henry Kissinger, Richard Perle, senior executives from Stratfor, Palintir Technology, et cetera. Lessig sounds completely different, as a son of wealth, when he is on Amy Goodman's &amp;quot;Democracy Now&amp;quot; then when he speaks before a City Club or financial reporter interview in front of his own people, other children of wealth. Progressives DO NOT attend Bilderberger meetings!

s
Seascapes
Oct 22, 2013

Please ... an audio book.

f
fincher42
Dec 18, 2012

I would like the audio book as well.

d
dag137
Jul 23, 2012

This book did a fantastic job of illuminating the corruption caused by money in politics. Unfortunately, Lessig's plan to stop it makes it feel even more hopeless.

g
gdaniel000
Feb 15, 2012

Is audiobook available?

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