Troubled Bones

Troubled Bones

Book - 2011
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Baker & Taylor
Ordered to Canterbury to investigate a threat against the bones of Saint Thomas áa Becket, disgraced knight Crispin Guest is accosted by court acquaintance Geoffrey Chaucer and a motley group of pilgrims who are looking for a murderer.

McMillan Palgrave

"Westerson has mastered her subject and has used that knowledge to create erudite entertainment."

--Richmond Times Dispatch on Veil of Lies



Disgraced knight Crispin Guest gets himself into some serious trouble in London and as a result is forced to accept an assignment far out of town. The Archbishop of Canterbury has specifically requested Guest to investigate a threat against the bones of saint and martyr Thomas a Beckett, which are on display in the cathedral in Canterbury. The archbishop has received letters threatening the safety of the artifacts, and he wants Guest to protect them and uncover whoever is after them.


When he arrives at Canterbury, Guest is accosted by an old acquaintance from court - one Geoffrey Chaucer - and is surrounded by a group in town on a pilgrimage. Trapped amongst the pilgrims (who were, quite possibly, the model for Chaucer's famous story cycle), looking for a murderer, a hidden heretic and a solution to the riddle that will allow him to go back home, Crispin Guest finds his considerable wit and intellect taxed to its very limit.



Baker
& Taylor

Ordered to Canterbury to investigate a threat against the bones of saint Thomas Beckett, disgraced knight Crispin Guest is accosted by court acquaintance Geoffrey Chaucer and a motley group of pilgrims who are looking for a murderer, a hidden heretic and a solution to the riddle that will restore Guest's reputation. 15,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : Minotaur Books, 2011
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780312621636
0312621639
Branch Call Number: MYS Westerson, J 100.4 2011
Characteristics: 288 pages : map ; 22 cm

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eternalworx4
Mar 28, 2017

Jeri Westerson has done it again. This time the fourth installment of her Medieval Noir series has disgraced knight Crispin Guest facing off against the Archbishop of Canterbury, William de Courtenay. Though the archbishop originally hired Crispin to protect the sacred relic bones of the martyr St. Thomas á Becket, and to discover a suspected Lollard heretic among his monks, Crispin instead finds himself racing to find a murderer.
Crispin is a "nobleman" in the truest sense of the word. Despite his background, his honor and sense of justice pushes him to stand against the archbishop, who attempts to hang an innocent Geoffrey Chaucer out of pure vindictiveness and hatred of Chaucer's master, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. Crispin's own former master and the man who raised him.
Jeri Westerson knows her English history well. And she uses it expertly to weave stories that are spellbinding and captivating. Her Author Afterword following each story explains the anchor points in history and how she brings them in to her stories, tying reality with her fiction almost seamlessly.
Her sense of place is strongly visual. I can actually "see" Crispin as he works his way through the crowded, mean alleys and backstreets of London as he searches for his clues. I can smell the cooking meats and smoky fires of the local alehouses where Crispin and Jack Tucker, his protégé, find some small comfort at the end of a long day. I watch the meager, barely warm fire in the small shabby room that is home for Crispin and Jack, a fire which does little to block the gusts of cold air stealing through the ill-fitting shutters. And I find myself reaching for a sweater as I watch Jack poking at the embers, trying to encourage a flame.
I found this installment just as riveting and addictive as I did the first three and I'm surprised by how easily Jeri Westerson captured my attention. The desolation of life in Middle Ages London, where so many fell prey to the power of those with wealth, has always kept me away from most historical fiction. But something about a disgraced knight still fighting to do the honorable thing, still believing in justice, caught my attention and I'm glad I took that first step into Crispin's life.
Jeri Westerson has created a world worth visiting, with characters worth knowing, accomplishing feats worth remembering. I look forward to my next adventure with Crispin and Jack.

p
Palomino
Jan 29, 2012

I liked this much better than others in the series. The author has, I dunno, loosened up. The confrontations between our hero and the Wife of Bath from the Canterbury Tales (yep, her) are hilarious... last thing I expected from a series that takes itself too seriously sometimes. Even the mystery plot was better than I remember from the other books.

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