The Meaning of Night

The Meaning of Night

A Confession

Book - 2006
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Baker & Taylor
Convinced that he is destined for great wealth, power, and influence, Edward Glyver will do anything to reclaim a prize that is rightfully his, including a showdown with his rival, poet-criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt.

Norton Pub
"After killing the red-haired man, I took myself off to Quinn's for an oyster supper." So begins the "enthralling" (Booklist, starred review) and "ingenious" (Boston Globe) story of Edward Glyver, booklover, scholar, and murderer. As a young boy, Glyver always believed he was destined for greatness. A chance discovery convinces him that he was right: greatness does await him, along with immense wealth and influence. Overwhelmed by his discovery, he will stop at nothing to win back a prize that he knows is rightfully his.Glyver's path to reclaim his prize leads him from the depths of Victorian London, with its foggy streets, brothels, and opium dens, to Evenwood, one of England's most beautiful and enchanting country houses, and finally to a consuming love for the beautiful but enigmatic Emily Carteret. His is a story of betrayal and treachery, of death and delusion, of ruthless obsession and ambition. And at every turn, driving Glyver irresistibly onward, is his deadly rival: the poet-criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt.The Meaning of Night is an enthralling novel that will captivate readers right up to its final thrilling revelation.
The atmosphere of Bleak House, the sensuous thrill of Perfume, and the mystery of Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell all combine in a story of murder, deceit, love, and revenge in Victorian England.

Blackwell North Amer
"After killing the red-haired man, I took myself off to Quinn's for an oyster supper." So begins the extraordinary story of Edward Glyver - booklover, scholar, and murderer. As a young boy, Glyver always believed he was destined for greatness. A chance discovery convinces him that he was right: greatness does await him, along with immense wealth and influence. Overwhelmed by his discovery, he will stop at nothing to win back a prize that he knows is rightfully his.
Glyver's path to reclaim this right leads him from the depths of Victorian London - with its foggy streets, brothels, and opium dens - to Evenwood, one of England's most beautiful and enchanting country houses, and finally to a consuming love for the beautiful but enigmatic Emily Carteret. His is a story of betrayal and treachery, of death and delusion, of ruthless obsession and ambition. And at every turn, driving Glyver irresistibly onward, is his deadly rival: the poet-criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt.

Baker
& Taylor

Convinced that he is destined for great wealth, power, and influence, Edward Glyver--booklover, scholar, and murderer--will to anything to reclaim a prize that is rightfully his, following a trail from the underworld depths of Victorian London, to the posh estate of Evenwood and all-consuming love for the enigmatic Emily Carteret, to an ultimate showdown with his rival, poet-criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt. 100,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton, [2006]
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: ©2006
ISBN: 9780393062038
0393062031
Branch Call Number: FIC Cox, M 2006
Characteristics: 703 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm

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Brontina66
Sep 13, 2017

This is definitely one of the best books I have ever read. I love Victorian novels, especially the ones by Wilkie Collins, and I found that "The Meaning of Night" has all the feel and the atmosphere of a Collins book. The plot is elaborate and it is not my intention to spoil the surprise for anyone, but I can say that there are several elements (obsession, drugs, love, revenge, ambition, hatred, disguise, murder, theft, betrayal) extremely well connected and developed. Basically, it's the story of a very resourceful young man who discovers his true origins and tries to get what is rightfully his. His nemesis is an old school mate who puts every sort of obstacles on our hero's path. I found myself rooting for the "villain" - or at least for one of them - and asking myself what I would do in his place. Last but not least, London is a protagonist here. The Victorian city described in such depth by Dickens and Mayhew comes alive with its aristocratic palaces, its beautiful parks, and its sordid slums. If you like Victorian England and its literature, I believe that this book will not disappoint you. I am looking forward to reading Cox' sequel to "The Meaning of Night."

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foxylady31
Aug 24, 2014

As with most Old English writings it is way too "wordy". For me it takes away something from the story, not adding too it. And the footnotes were mostly not really related to the story--just descriptive of the locations of the area. I guess, due to fact I read "The Glass of Time" first which was a continuation of this story. Maybe I would have found it more compelling and interesting but instead found it a lot repetative in many instances.

More like the meaning of spooky! This story starts out with a cold blooded murder then continues on with one diabolical plot twist and turn after another. Lots of suspense, intrigue, and subterfuge that leave you wondering just who IS the real villain here? The true nature of these evil, yet sometimes likable characters is only hinted at, leaving us, in the end trusting no one. Well researched this book has it all; history, romance and murder. The setting, Victorian England, is a perfect choice for this psychological thriller. Chilling!

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bougie
Jan 26, 2013

Yup, too wordy.

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dernalbert
Aug 13, 2012

I'm with becker on this one: too many words. It was a pretty compelling mystery and worth the read regardless.

cocokliks Nov 08, 2011

A beautifully written book which any fan of historical mystery will love, especially those who have a taste for Edgar Allen Poe.

RenGrrl May 31, 2011

Another gripping Victorian mystery by Michael Cox!

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becker
Apr 28, 2010

This historical fiction which reads like a mystery is a compelling and complex story full of twists and turns. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would have given it an even higher rating except for one significant factor. It is far too wordy. Michael Cox has quite a way with words and loves to put them together in long strings, but his writing style is excessively wordy and I can't say it adds to the story. If anything I found it detracted from the story and tried my patience. I was eager to follow the progression of the plot, and I was constantly thinking "Just get on with it - I want to know what happens next". His outstanding research is backed up with countless footnotes but I found most of them to bear little on the enjoyment or understanding of the story. Bottom line is...this is a great read, but certainly nothing to rush through. It needs to be enjoyed for what it is

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notTom Dec 16, 2010

In dark, dreary Victorian England, a man seeks revenge at all costs against the person that destroyed his life. Amongst the foggy streets of London and the drizzle-dampened grounds of great country manors, the novel takes the form of a confession by a man named Edward Glyver of all that he has done to exact retribution upon the odious Phoebus Daunt, While Daunt has achieved a prominent status in society because of his oily guile and handsome looks, Glyver discovers truths about his real identity that unearths Daunt's treachery: that Daunt is stealing his inheritance. While meeting a woman and falling desperately in love with her, Glyver plots the ultimate revenge. These tumultuous parts of Glyver's life collide in a manner that he never expected, and will lead him to contemplate the unthinkable: murder.

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