The Longest Night

The Longest Night

The Bombing of London on May 10, 1941

Book - 2005
Rate this:
Penguin Putnam
The first in-depth account of the WWII raid that almost defeated England.

Seven months after the Nazi Blitz began in September 1940, London remained the center of the free world's resistance to Hitler's Germany. But-contrary to popular belief-the city's "all-in-together" camaraderie was disintegrating after two devastating Luftwaffe raids. Civil Defenses were chronically short of volunteers and newspapers reported looting, petty crime, and price-gouging.

But there was reason for optimism. Churchill remained steadfast, rallying the English. London hadn't been bombed in three weeks, while the RAF shot down 90 German bombers over Britain. It began to appear that the worst could be over.

So, when the air raid sirens sounded on the evening of May 10, 1941, Londoners were nonchalant. It soon became clear, however, that this was no ordinary bombing, but a devastating Luftwaffe raid that would eclipse all others.

Baker & Taylor
Numerous eyewitness accounts, survivor testimony, and previously classified documents inform a close-up look at a devastating bombing raid by the Luftwaffe on London on May 10, 1941, revealing the near catastrophoic results of the raid in terms of the ultimate fate of the British during World War II.

Blackwell North Amer
Seven months after the Nazi blitz began in September 1940, London remained the center of the free world's resistance to Hitler's Germany but - contrary to popular belief - its "all-in-together" camaraderie was disintegrating. Two devastating Luftwaffe raids in April, 1941 killed more than 2,300 Londoners. The city's civil defenses were chronically undermanned as the breezy enthusiasm of those who volunteered in 1939 cracked under the incessant bombing. Newspapers reported looting, petty crime, and price-gouging.
But there was reason for optimism. Churchill remained unfailingly belligerent as he rallied the English. London hadn't been bombed in three weeks, while the RAF shot down ninety German bombers over Britain. It began to appear that the worst could be over.
So, when the first notes of the air raid siren sounded on the evening of May 10, 1941, few citizens even bothered going into the shelters. A similar nonchalance prevailed among the defenders of the nation's capital. It soon became clear, however, as the bombs began to rain down that this was no ordinary blitz but a Luftwaffe raid so devastating that it would eclipse all others...
The Longest Night tells the untold story of the horrific raid of May 10, 1941 - and how it almost brought Britain to military collapse. Using extensive survivors' testimony and previously classified documents, it reveals just how close the Luftwaffe came to total victory. This account depicts how fate shifted based on Hitler's mistaken belief that he'd actually lost the air war of Britain - and dramatically portrays the unsurpassed; "we-can-take-it" bravery of the British people when they'd been pushed beyond all human endurance.

Publisher: New York : Berkley Caliber, 2005
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780425205570
0425205576
Branch Call Number: 940.53 Mortimer 2005
Characteristics: x, 356 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, portraits ; 24 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at KHCPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top