The Midnight Disease

The Midnight Disease

The Drive to Write, Writer's Block, and the Creative Brain

Book - 2004
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Houghton
What underlies the human ability, desire, and even compulsion to write? Alice Flaherty first explores the brain state called hypergraphia - the overwhelming desire to write - and the science behind its antithesis, writer's block. As a leading neurologist at a major research hospital, Flaherty writes from the front lines of brain research. Her voice, driven and surprisingly original, has its roots in her own experiences of hypergraphia, triggered by a postpartum mood disorder. Both qualifications lend power to Flaherty's riveting connection between the biology of human longing and the drive to communicate.
The Midnight Disease charts exciting new territory concerning the roles of mind and body in the creative process. Flaherty - whose engagement with her patients and lifelong passion for literature enrich each page - argues for the importance of emotion in writing, illuminates the role that mood disorders play in the lives of many writers, and explores with profound insight the experience of being "visited by the muse." Her understanding of the role of the brain's temporal lobes and limbic system in the drive to write challenges the popular idea that creativity emerges solely from the right side of the brain. Finally, The Midnight Disease casts lights on the methods and madness of writers past and present, from Dostoevsky to Conrad, from Sylvia Plath to Stephen King.
The Midnight Disease brings the very latest brain science to bear on the most compelling questions surrounding human creativity.


Baker & Taylor
A leading neurologist and specialist in the field of brain research explores the link between the biology of pain and the human drive to communicate as she examines the importance of emotion in writing, the compulsion to write and its effects on the body, the nature of creativity, and the impact of writer's block.

Book News
Neurologist Flaherty (Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School) explains the psychological and neuroscientific knowledge about the process of writing for a lay audience. She discusses the temporal lobe's role in "abnormal hypergraphia," an increased desire to write. She then explores psychological and neurological explanations for writer's block. The roles of the cerebral cortex in writing ability, the limbic system in the drive to communication, and the temporal lob in metaphorical thinking are examined in subsequent chapters. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Explores the link between the biology of pain and the human drive to communicate, examining the importance of emotion in writing, the compulsion to write and its effects on the body, the nature of creativity, and the impact of writer's block.

Publisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2004
ISBN: 9780618230655
0618230653
Branch Call Number: 808.02 Flaherty 2004
Characteristics: 307 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm

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robe0358
Jun 24, 2011

A book with an engaging combination of science, history and first hand experiences of hypergraphia. Great for writers and scientific researchers.

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