Don Quixote

Don Quixote

Book - 2003
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Baker & Taylor
A definitive English translation of the sixteenth-century classic follows the adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, as they travel through Spain and become subject to the noble knight-errant's fanciful imagination.

HARPERCOLL

Edith Grossman's definitive English translation of the Spanish masterpiece, in an expanded P.S. edition

Widely regarded as one of the funniest and most tragic books ever written, Don Quixote chronicles the adventures of the self-created knight-errant Don Quixote of La Mancha and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, as they travel through sixteenth-century Spain. You haven't experienced Don Quixote in English until you've read this masterful translation.

This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.



Baker
& Taylor

Presents the classic early-seventeenth-century Spanish novel of chivalry and abiding optimism, depicting the exploits of a knight who attempts to bring justice and truth to the world.

Publisher: New York : Ecco, [2003]
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: ©2003
ISBN: 9780060188702
0060188707
Branch Call Number: FIC Cervantes Saavedra, M 2003
Characteristics: xxxv, 940 pages ; 25 cm
Additional Contributors: Bloom, Harold
Grossman, Edith 1936-
Alternative Title: Don Quixote. English

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TEENREVIEWBOARD
Sep 08, 2016

Don Quixote is a book that covers thousands of tiny details and asides to unveil a complete, epic masterpiece of a story, and it never feels as though any of these happenstances are out of place or unneeded. This book is quite lengthy, at over one thousand pages, but somehow makes every page worth the reading. This is a tale that is thrilling to read, and just as exciting to recount years later; because of the millions of irrelevant yet necessary events that take place in this novel, the imagery and broader plot are so densely rich, electrifying, and vivid that the picture of some of the greater scenes are unforgettable. If you can find the time, this is a fantastic book.
- @FalcoLombardi of the Teen Review Board at the Hamilton Public Library

This literal historical novel produced by the late Spanish writer, with our protagonist Don Quixote, a delusional old man who has a mission of restoring the social practice of chivalry, going on adventures and usually ending up hurt in the process. Don is a very interesting character. But I quickly got bored of his antics. I know that this has interested many, however, I don't see any profound meaning to the story.
- @Florence of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

r
rpavlacic
Feb 17, 2016

It's often been said that Don Quixote may be the greatest fictional story ever told, and after reading it for myself I would certainly have to agree. One can never be sure if the protagonist is ingenious, insane or just plain delusional, but it is from he that we get the expression "tilting at windmills" - fighting antagonists and enemies (human or otherwise) that do not exist. The deuterotagonist of Sancho Panza is at times Quixote's most loyal sidekick and at others his greatest critic.

The genius of Cervantes is evident more than four centuries after he first wrote his words. The book was actually written in two parts about ten years apart; the second part of the novel was drafted when a "fake" Quixote was published by a rival, and there are frequent references to this alleged author and the false version of the story as well, "setting the record straight" as it were in the second part.

Don Quixote is not an easy story to translate into English. But this particular version by Edith Grossman may be the most faithful translation that exists in the marketplace. It's not too scholarly but she doesn't use simplistic words either - where a longer and more accurate word is appropriate, that is what she uses. There are quite a few footnotes from Ms Grossman to explain the context of quotations, Latin phrases, and double entendres, as well as those places where the second person plural is used to address an individual either formally or in condescension - something that exists in Latinate languages but is lacking in English.

If you think you'll read this book in a couple of days, you're dreaming. Try two to three weeks. But you'll be entertained as you rarely have, and gain a window into life in Spain in the days of the Inquisition and when stories of knights errant - the would be successors to the Knights of the Round Table - were all the rage.

d
dedmanshootn
Jun 21, 2015

an excellent translation and work. very scholarly and yet very readable and enjoyable

Lanni_T Dec 19, 2014

I'm ashamed to say that I didn't find almost anything enjoyable in the book of such profound cultural influence. It was a laborious and unhappy read, a seemingly never-ending adventures of an eccentric and delusional knight...

BigMoose Jun 27, 2014

Absolutely hilarious!

JCLJulieT Nov 22, 2011

This translation, by Edith Grossman, is the clearest and most engaging that I have read. If you're going to read Don Quiote, I recommend this one.

m
mariaf
Mar 02, 2009

Widely regarded as the wqorld's first modern novel, Don Quixote chronicles the famous picaresque adventures of the noble knight-errand Don Quixote de La Mancha and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza as they travel through sixteenth century Spain.

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Laura_X Jan 12, 2015

What intelligent things you say sometimes ! One would think you had studied.

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